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Edible Flowers






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Caution: Not all flowers are edible




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Below are some flowers that can be eaten.
If you're sampling edible flowers for the first time, the best way is to introduce them into your diet a little at a time to avoid digestive problems. Keep any dishes simple, ie. don't add too many other flavours that will over-power the delicate taste of the flower:


> Anise Hyssop

> Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

> Borage Blossom (Borago officinalis)

> Calendula (calendula officinalis)

> Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus)

> Chamomile

> Chervil Flowers

> Chive Blossoms

> Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium)

> Clover

> Dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis)

> Dianthus (dianthus caryophyllus)

> Elder Flower (Sambucus nigra)

> Fuchsia (Fuchsia X hybrida)

> Garden Sorrel

> Gladiolus

> Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

> Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus)

> Rose (Rosa species)



For a more extensive list, there is some excellent information on www.whatscookingamerica.net


Flowers have been eaten since ancient times, and have medicinal as well as nutritional value. Oriental dishes through the ages have made use of Day-Lily buds and Chrysanthemums, the Romans used mallow, rose and violets, Italian and Hispanic cultures gave us stuffed squash blossoms and Asian Indians continue to use rose petals in many recipes...

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Nowadays, in the Western world, the most common use of flowers is in salads. But more and more people are becoming adventurous as they realize the flavour and health potential of flower blooms and buds. Edible flowers have lots of potential. You can in fact add them to sauces, tarts, preserves, pickles, fritters and soft cheeses.

Though many blossoms contain vitamin C and/or vitamin A, not all flowers are edible, so only experiment with ones you know are tried and trusted. Herb flowers usually offer the same flavour and attributes as the edible leaves, though they may be milder. If you suffer from asthma or allergic reactions to composite-type flowers (calendula, chicory, chrysanthemum, daisy, English daisy, and marigold) you should avoid eating flowers altogether as they may well cause you discomfort. If you're sampling edible flowers for the first time, the best way is to introduce them into your diet a little at a time to avoid digestive problems.

Eat organically grown flowers only
It is important to remember that flowers are only edible if they are either organically grown or treated with organic pesticides like those used on fruits and vegetables. Flowers from florists, nurseries or garden centres are grown for decoration and have often been chemically treated, either by fertilizers or pesticides. If you don't have the time or resources to grow your own edible flowers, many gourmet markets now stock them fresh or frozen.

When to pick edible flowers
If you're preparing homegrown flowers the best time to pick them is early morning when their water content will be at its maximum. Only use fresh blossoms that are undamaged by disease, weather or insects. You should be very careful to remove the stems and pistils and also any white inner petal tips from the bud as these often taste bitter. Wash the blooms thoroughly before adding them to your food. Above all experiment and enjoy.


Extracted from and with thanks to: www.Safe Slimming.co.uk

For further advice and information on how to choose edible flowers, visit: www.whatscookingamerica.net
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